City of Marina, CA
Print PageRSS Feeds
City of Marina

Go To Search
Become Disaster Resilient
Do One Thing
Preparing yourself for an emergency situation can be an overwhelming task. We all ask questions like, "What emergency do we prepare for first?", "What's the most important needs of myself or my family?"

Many of us are more prepared than we think. We all have the necessary things around our home to sustain us in an emergency, however we all may not know what those are or where they are when the time calls.

The website has put together a comprehensive plan to get ready over a years time and within your budget. Every month there is a topic to review or task to complete. By the end of the year you will be feel confident about making through the unthinkable. 

We have outlined below 12 things to think about:

#1 Make a Plan
Family Plan
Disasters change things. When an emergency happens you may have to decide what to do very quickly, while you are worrying about what might happen. By planning ahead, it will be easier to make the right decisions when the worst happens.

Some of the things you can plan our are:

  • Plan what to do if you have to evacuate
  • Take steps now to prevent damage to your home in a disaster
  • Learn what disasters can happen in your area and decide what you will do in those instances.

For more information on making a plan, please visit

#2 Store Water
water image
Whether you get water from a municipal water system or your home has a private well, your water supply depends on having power to operate the system. During a power outage—or any disaster that can cause a power outage, such as high winds, ice storm, or flood—you may find yourself without drinkable water.

For more information on storing water, please visit

#3 Shelter
In a disaster you may be asked to either evacuate or shelter-in-place. In the excitement of an emergency, it can be difficult to focus on what you are doing. Know what to do to keep your family safe. Practice your tornado and fire safety plans. If your family has practiced, they will be more comfortable doing it when the emergency actually happens.

For more information on sheltering, please visit

#4 Food
An emergency food supply doesn’t have to sit on a shelf, ready for disaster to strike (although it can). It can be part of the food you use every day. The key to a good food storage plan is to buy ahead of time. Replace items before they run out. Buy items when they are on sale. A large duffle bag or plastic tub with a lid makes a great storage place for an emergency food supply. Make sure your family, including pets, will have what they need when disaster strikes.

For more information on emergency food supplies, visit

#5 Community

Disasters can happen at any time. If you are away from home do you know where to find safe shelter locations? Do you know what the emergency procedures are for your child’s school or for your workplace? Will people who count on you know what to do if you can’t reach them? Know how to make sure you and your loved ones are safe in a disaster, no matter where you are.

Learn more: The “Emergency Supplies” fact sheet has more information about making emergency kits for work and school.

#6 Unique Family Needs
girl and pets
Every household is different. Is there an infant or young child in your home? Does someone in your family have a medical condition that requires medication? Do you have a pet? Before disaster strikes, talk to your family about your household’s unique needs. Make a list of special items you may need in a disaster.

For more information on unique family needs, visit

#7 Community Communication Plan
Today we have more ways to speak with one another than ever before. We are used to staying in touch with cell phones, internet, and email, but disasters can change things. These devices may not be available. Cell phone towers quickly become overloaded with people trying to reach friends and family. If the power is out at your home, cordless phones, internet, and email will not work either.

For more information on unique family needs, visit

#8 Get Involved

It takes more than police, fire and EMS to respond to a disaster. It takes people who are committed to neighborhoods, churches, schools and volunteer organizations. When people are willing to work together for the good of others, communities are stronger.

People who are involved are the key to a disaster resilient community. They are willing and able to look out for themselves and others. A resilient community is one that can withstand a disaster and get back to normal quickly (even if normal isn’t the same as it was before).

Remember, community preparedness starts at home. If you know that your family is prepared at home, you will be better able to help others in your community.

For more information on what you can do to become more involved, please visit

#9 Be Informed

Getting correct information during an emergency is the key to taking safe action. Someone in your household may not be able to receive, understand, or act on emergency information. Think about what special needs your household may have. Take action now to make sure everyone in your family will be safe in an emergency. 

Things to consider…

  • Emergency news or weather broadcasts may not be closed captioned.
  • Information that is shown on screen may not be spoken aloud.
  • Automated voices and voices over loud speakers may be hard to understand.
  • Information comes quickly and the stress of a disaster may make it hard to understand or remember instructions.
  • Words moving across the bottom of a television screen may move very quickly.
  • The screen color or color of the text might make some information on television hard to read.

For more information, visit

#10 Power

We count on electricity for heat, food, and medical needs. Many gas appliances even need electricity to run. A power outage is an emergency that often follows another emergency—like a hurricane, tornado, or winter storm. That makes it even more important to be prepared in advance.

Power Outage Safety

  • Discard food if the temperature in your refrigerator exceeds 40 degrees for more than 2 hours.
  • Stay away from downed power lines and anything they are in contact with such as fences or buildings.
  • Never drive over downed power lines; they may be energized.
  • Never use charcoal or gas grills inside a structure. You may be overcome by carbon monoxide.
  • If you must use candles, be sure to use them safely. Never leave candles burning unattended.

For more information on power emergencies, please visit

#11 Emergency Supplies

Any emergency is easier to handle when you have prepared ahead of time. Put together an emergency kit with important items to keep at home, and a go bag with items you will need to take with you if you evacuate. Think about what you and your family would need in a disaster. You can make kits for your home, car or workplace. Emergencies can happen anywhere.

When severe weather is predicted, make sure your car has a full tank of gas. You don’t want to wait in line for gas if you are told to evacuate. Some storms may also knock out electricity, causing gas stations to close.

For more information on Emergency Supply Kits, please visit

#12 First Aid
An emergency can happen at any time and any place. Many public places have a first aid kit, oxygen, or an AED (automated external defibrillator) to treat people. These items can only save lives if someone knows how to use them. Actions you take in the first few minutes after an injury or other medical incident may save someone’s life.

For more information on preparing to give first aid, please visit

Tree City USA California redevelopment association award winner
City of Marina | 211 Hillcrest Avenue | Marina, CA 93933 | Phone: (831) 884-1278 | E-mail:
Contact Us     |    Hablan Español     |    Intranet     |    Sitemap     |    Accessibility     |    Powered by CivicPlus  |  Copyright Notices